Gun violence has a devastating impact on American children and teenagers. Over 2,700 children and teens (ages 0-19) are shot and killed and nearly 14,500 are shot and injured every year – that’s an average of 47 American children and teens shot every day.1 And the effects of gun violence extend far beyond those struck by a bullet: gun violence shapes the lives of the millions of children who witness it, know someone who was shot, or live in fear of the next shooting.

A gun is a dangerous weapon to keep at home which is why one must exert caution when using it or storing it at home. If your gun falls into the wrong hands, it could be detrimental to you and your family.

A lot of people get a gun license so that they can defend themselves and their loved ones in the case of an attack but a lot of times this plan backfires because the gun is not kept in a secure location.

This is why people often install gun safes at their home so that they can keep their gun protected and can enjoy a peaceful and sound sleep every night. However, buying a gun safe has both pros and cons which every gun owner should know about before purchasing it.

 

 

In honor of National Suicide Prevention Week ,

Here are some great safety tips on keeping your firearms and everyone in your family safe.

Safe-storage. Here is a hopeful fact: among firearm-owning households, those that store their firearms safely have a 60 percent lower suicide rate. This reduction arises because members of the household (such as adolescents) who are not authorized to use the firearms, can no longer easily access them. It also seems that some impulsive handgun suicides are averted by the simple need to take a few minutes to perform several precise manual actions to unlock, load, and use the firearm. This gives the individual time to reflect upon his or her actions. If just a quarter of households kept their guns from a suicidal person, it is estimated that 3600 to 3900 American lives would be saved in one year.
What constitutes “safe storage”? Simply hiding the weapon is not good enough. The firearm should be stored and locked away.

It is a common misconception , even among some healthcare professionals ,that if a gun is locked away in a safe, an individual in crisis will “find another way.” But this is not the case; if a person’s preferred method of suicide is not available, most do not substitute another method. Even when they do, other methods are less fatal. In short, the option of having your firearm locked away and not avaiable increases the chances of survival.
A gun makes an impulsive, irreversible choice far too easy. Limiting access to guns during fleeting, high-risk moments can save lives