Tag Archives: #cali#progun#gunsafety

FIREARMS SHOULD BE UNLOADED WHEN NOT ACTUALLY IN USE
Firearms should be loaded only when you are in the field or on the target range or shooting area, ready to shoot. When not in use, firearms and ammunition should be secured in a safe place, separate from each other. It is your responsibility to prevent children and unauthorized adults from gaining access to firearms or ammunition.

Whenever you handle a firearm or hand it to someone, always open the action immediately, and visually check the chamber, receiver and magazine to be certain they do not contain any ammunition. Always keep actions open when not in use. Never assume a gun is unloaded — check for yourself! This is considered a mark of an experienced gun handler!

DON’T RELY ON YOUR GUN’S “SAFETY”
Don’t Rely On Your Gun’s Safety ,Treat every gun as though it can fire at any time. The “safety” on any gun is a mechanical device which, like any such device, can become inoperable at the worst possible time. Besides, by mistake, the safety may be “off” when you think it is “on.” The safety serves as a supplement to proper gun handling but cannot possibly serve as a substitute for common sense. You should never handle a gun carelessly and assume that the gun won’t fire just because the “safety is on.”

Never touch the trigger on a firearm until you actually intend to shoot. Keep your fingers away from the trigger while loading or unloading. Never pull the trigger on any firearm with the safety on the “safe” position or anywhere in between “safe” and “fire.” It is possible that the gun can fire at any time, or even later when you release the safety, without you ever touching the trigger again.

Never place the safety in between positions, since half-safe is unsafe. Keep the safety “on” until you are absolutely ready to fire.

Regardless of the position of the safety, any blow or jar strong enough to actuate the firing mechanism of a gun can cause it to fire. This can happen even if the trigger is not touched, such as when a gun is dropped. Never rest a loaded gun against any object because there is always the possibility that it will be jarred or slide from its position and fall with sufficient force to discharge. The only time you can be absolutely certain that a gun cannot fire is when the action is open and it is completely empty. Again, never rely on your gun’s safety. You and the safe gun handling procedures you have learned are your gun’s primary safeties.

First Time Gun Buyer Guide 

At some point, many people decide to purchase a firearm for home and personal protection. It might happen when you turn 21. It might cross your mind long after retirement when you realize you’re not as spry as you once were. It may be once you have a child and understand that you’re responsible for the baby’s safety. Perhaps it will be after your job transfers you to a rough neighborhood.

No matter when you decide to become a first-time gun buyer, it’s important to know the fundamentals and have a plan in place. A firearm comes with many strings attached. Here are important tips and suggestions for first-time handgun buyers.

Choosing Your First Gun

Personal firearms can range from the smallest pocket pistols and handguns to shotguns, rifles, and even cannons. Determine when and how you would use the firearm to help narrow down your field of options and keep common sense in mind. Do you plan to keep it in your home safe or use it as a weapon to carry on your person?

Guns for Home Defense

For home defense, a shotgun may be the best option. Choices include semi-automatic, pump style, or even single shot, all with both long and shorter-barreled options for the guns. You can mount lights or laser pointers (or both) on shotguns and they are reliable, effective, and fairly easy to use. They also come in several ammunition sizes. You can even get a pistol styled shotgun in the .410-gauge size. For first-time gun buyers, a small rifle or handgun would be a good alternative.

It’s important to properly store your home defense gun to keep it out of the hands of potential thieves and small children. A gun safe is the best option for securing your shotgun. Choose a gun safe that is fire rated and, if possible, includes anti-drill protection and pry-prevention.

Handguns for Personal Carry

When carrying your firearm, you have the option for open or concealed carry. Typically, open carry is not as common as concealed carry so it’s important to know the options you have in your state. Depending on how you want to carry your gun, along with the way you dress and even your physical size, certain factors may help determine what kind of firearm to get. Generally, a firearm that you will carry as a self-defense weapon is going to be a pistol or handgun.

Which Pistol and What Ammo? 

A revolver offers simple and reliable use with a trade-off for the number of rounds you can carry. A semi-auto provides more bullets in the gun but includes more working parts and a greater chance of having a malfunction (a jam) that would require additional knowledge and skill.

Most people will never need a firearm for self-protection. Chances are that if someone ever does, a five or six round revolver would be sufficient. However, if you have the option and ability to have 30 rounds immediately available in a gunfight as opposed to six, most people would choose the larger number.

Caliber is the next question that would need to be answered. I generally suggest the best size is the largest caliber you can get for the type of pistol you want, the recoil that you’re comfortable with, and the physical resistance of the weapon’s internal

Personal Firearm Fundamentals

Gun Training

No one is born with the knowledge and skills of a good marksman. Whether you use a bazooka or a midnight special, you must be successfully trained and educated in gun usage and safety. Chances are the local police department or the store where you purchase the firearm will be able to recommend a certified gun safety course. Most gun clubs and ranges offer several levels of gun safety courses.

Firearm Responsibility

Owning a firearm, especially for the purposes of self-defense, requires some serious responsibility. For first-time gun buyers and seasoned veterans, you need responsible training so that you can safely and effectively operate the firearm under any circumstances. You are responsible for the safe gun Vaults  and maintenance of the firearm.

You must also determine if you are emotionally responsible enough to use the firearm in a violent encounter with a criminal who is threatening your life or the life of someone you are protecting. While you may never really know the answer to that question until it happens, training and self-evaluation will arm you with the skills you need to stay safe.

 

 

-By Sirak Peralta

Some trying to comply with California’s latest gun control mandates were left scratching their heads after the state’s website bogged down approaching the deadline.

Required to register guns newly classified as “assault weapons” by June 30 due to a change in state law concerning bullet buttons and homemade firearms, many instead found themselves shut out of the online process. In acknowledging the problems with the California Firearms Application Reporting System, which requires users to submit a number of photographs of their firearm as well as their own personal information, officials simply said the system was “experiencing a high volume of users,” and recommended steps for gun owners to troubleshoot their own computer equipment. However, the problem may go deeper than the last minute surge in use.

Jay Jacobson, who has been trying to register some of his personal rifles since April, told a Bay Area CBS affiliate that he has had one of his builds rejected by DOJ at least three times.

“Everybody that’s doing this is doing so to comply, they have a willingness to follow the law. And yet they’re making it as difficult as possible,” said Jacobson.

Others, details the report, have been busy modifying guns to make them “featureless” and thus not considered an assault weapon under California law. As detailed by another reportfrom ABC30, one Fresno area shop saw lots of demand for sub-caliber kits that convert their ARs to shoot .22LR.

Both Gun Owners of California and the California Rifle and Pistol Association issued alerts and reference guides on options available to those impacted by the registration with the latter holding a series of webinars on how to legally avoid the process by modifying builds and the legal ramifications of building a “ghost gun” in the state.

In reaction to the news that CFARS was rife with issues in the lead-up to Saturday’s deadline, both the Firearms Policy Coalition and CRPA warned those experiencing problems of their rights and are actively seeking information from those who found the process inaccessible.

“Given the serious problems currently facing CFARS, if you intend to register, it is recommended that you maintain detailed records of your registration attempts, including screenshots, pictures, or videos, indicating the date and time of your attempts,” noted the National Rifle Association’s state affiliate.

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